On April 30th, the Crown Forces arrived at the estate of General George Washington and soon brought his Continental and allied forces to battle as the clouds gathered on an ominous spring day.  The Guards comprised the Third Platoon of the First Battalion, led by Colonel Eric Schnitzer of the 62nd Regiment of Foot.  Others joined under the Colonel's command included:

First Battalion assembles to the southeast of Washington's Lower Garden.

First Battalion assembles to the southeast of Washington's Lower Garden.

The Coldstream, veterans of many prior engagements, show no concern for the enemy rabble on the far side of the estate.

The Coldstream, veterans of many prior engagements, show no concern for the enemy rabble on the far side of the estate.

The battalion first engaged Rebel skirmishers along the fence line of the Lower Garden.  Advancing step by step with several guns of the Royal Artillery, the enemy was beaten back volley by volley.  Yet, we were not without our own casualties, as several of the honoured dead fell among Washington's fruit trees.

After pushing through the Lower Garden, First Battalion advances beyond the Royal Artillery guns to engage the enemy on open ground.

After pushing through the Lower Garden, First Battalion advances beyond the Royal Artillery guns to engage the enemy on open ground.

Emerging from the garden and onto flat ground, First Battalion linked up with Second Battalion to squeeze the remaining Rebel forces.  With the enemy surrounded and pressed on two sides, Colonel Schnitzer ordered the First Battalion to fix bayonets and drive them from the field.  The Continentals shortly withdrew into the woodline, giving the day's victory to the Crown Forces.

4th Company retired to camp for a delicious "victory meal", hoping the weather would hold off for the evening.

4th Company retired to camp for a delicious "victory meal", hoping the weather would hold off for the evening.

As night fell, Serjeant Theis ordered a small raiding party depart to obtain some of Washington's finest ale (generously provided by Mount Vernon staff). A good time was had by all, as said party returned to camp (careful to offer the parole when challenged by the pickets) with quite the cast of characters: a Continental prisoner, a Hessian ally, but most shockingly - Private Sean Wallis, formerly of the 4th Company.  Having deserted the British Army nearly ten years ago, Private Wallis had turned privateer and joined up with the North Carolina militia to fight for the Rebel Army! Luckily, all was soon forgiven as the Company discovered the Captain's secret stash of rum - to be joined by several troublemakers of the 42nd Highlanders.

Sadly by the morning, as many of us were nursing the effects of the night's ribaldry, the weather turned for the worse.  Rather than risk destruction of valuable powder in what surely would rival the Battle of the Clouds of several years prior, much of the Crown Forces (including the 4th Company) chose to cede the grounds to the Rebel Army and beat a tactical retreat....to regroup and fight another day...

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