By late October, the Brigade had regained its strength and was on the move to Annapolis, the capital of His Majesty's rebellious colony of Maryland.  Our orders were to occupy the home and grounds of William Paca, signer of the so-called Declaration of Independence, and general rabble rouser.

After arriving in town, a detachment of Guardsmen led by Captain Sheffer conducted regular patrols to ensure the colonists did not rise above their average level of agitation.

The estate and grounds of William Paca, traitor to the King.

The estate and grounds of William Paca, traitor to the King.

Those present for garrison duty include Serjeant Theis and Guardsman Patchak, as well as a detachment of His Majesty's Marines.

The Captain, enjoying a brief respite from harassing local troublemakers. An ensign and private from His Majesty's Marines were also stationed in the area.

The Captain, enjoying a brief respite from harassing local troublemakers. An ensign and private from His Majesty's Marines were also stationed in the area.

Following several hours of manning our designated post, as well as enjoying our fair share of rum punch absconded from Mr. Paca's kitchen, the Brigade retired to a nearby tavern.

The Captain and Serjeant confer on how best to put down the incitement of a local rally against the King.

The Captain and Serjeant confer on how best to put down the incitement of a local rally against the King.

Unfortunately, said tavern was owned and operated by a known rebel sympathizer (and Irishman). As we concluded our meal and exited the premise, the good Serjeant was sure to make clear to the local crowd that the long hand of the British Empire would be there to stay in Annapolis, at least for the time being.

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